Veeam v9 – New Feature Annoucements

While the need for backups hasn’t changed, how you use these backups has. Not only that, the speed at which we can recover our data is changing as well. As the cost of downtime continues to grow, having to restore an entire server just to recover one file or a small number of files just won’t cut it. Your backup needs to be backup quickly and restore even faster.

The improvements in Veeam v9 are doing just that. Veeam has been introducing faster and faster ways to backup and restore (and limit the impact on production virtual machines during backups as well) for years and v9 is no exception. There are a few new options I want to touch on that are pain points I’ve experienced in my environments.

1. Backups from Snapmirror/Snapvault destinations.
As a former NetApp admin, I love the idea of minimizing the effect of backups on my virtual machines. By enabling backup from snapmirror destinations, you can get your VMs offsite using built in software on your NetApp array, and then create off-SAN backups that aren’t limited by your snapmirror rentention schedule due to space constraints.

2. Direct NFS Backup Mode
Direct SAN access has been in Veeam Backup & Replication forever, but backing up VMs on your NFS datastores was a different story. A proxied connection was required through an ESXi host to backup these VMs. In v9, a brand new NFS client was written by the engineers at Veeam to connect directly to your NFS volumes and backup VMs without additional host impact, latency, or speed constraints.

3. Per VM-backup File chain
As the size of your backup job grows, the managing of that file gets to be painful. As your backup repository begins to fill up you’re left having to migrate the entire backup file to a new repository. By creating a Per-VM backup file chain, one job can be created for all of your virtual machines, but each VM has its own file chain. This feature is especially useful with the next feature I’ll talk about.

4. Scale-out Backup Repository
Backup repository management has always been one of the largest pain points when managing Veeam backup jobs. I remember my first Veeam setup I was limited to 2TB LUNs on my backup server and I had to create 8 of them to store my backups. As backup jobs couldn’t span repositories, this meant I was creating individual jobs tied to repositories and then rebalancing as repositories began to fill. The Scale-out backup repository feature allows a virtual backup repository to be create on top of your current physical repositories. Now fewer jobs need to be created and you’re able to take advantage of all the space in each repository. Thanks to Luca Dell’Oca for clarifying that maintenance mode and evacuation are also supported. This mean if a repository needs to be taken down (due to SAN maintenance for example) it can be marked as maintenance mode and excluded from the repository during maintenance operations.

For me, these are the 3 big features I’m happy to see in Veeam v9. There are additional features such as explorers for Oracle, Active Directory (support for AD-integrated DNS and GPO restoration!), SQL Server and SharePoint. The entire list of new features can be found at the link below.

Click here for all the feature announcements.

Veeam v9 – New Feature Annoucements

VeeamON 2015

As exciting as VMworld is each and every year, it appears to have lost its charm. Yes, it’s the largest gathering of virtualization people (my people) each and every year, but that is part of the problem. 20,000+ of my closest friends isn’t quite as intimate as it sounds. Oh, we’re close, but that’s more about proximity than the strength of our friendships.

The value of VMworld is the sessions, labs and networking opportunities. With sessions and labs being available after the conference ends, it’s important to maximize those networking opportunities as best you can. Trying to find someone in a crowd of 20,000 is difficult. If you’re not stalking your favorite virtualization professionals on Twitter you’ll likely miss them. Enter VeeamON.

This is the second year for VeeamON and my first year in attendance. Veeam, everyone’s favorite data protection & availability company (or at least mine), holds their annual gathering of data availability experts in Las Vegas (at the Aria hotel this year). What is normally just a function of our jobs is brought to the forefront in this conference. The size of VeeamON which has an expected attendance of 2500+ people will see many more opportunities to get one-on-one time with those in attendance.

VeeamON focuses on community, much like Veeam itself has done over the years. This dedication to educating and enabling the community is what has made Veeam Software successful and respected in the industry. Veeam is bringing out the vBrownbag crew for 19 sessions that will be available live during the conference as well. Its users and the community have helped shaped Veeam and built very passionate advocates.

With vendor sponsored sessions that consist of integration with the various aspects of the Veeam software features (such as Veeam Explorer for Storage Snapshots) as well as a focus on customer and user sessions that describe their use of Veeam solutions in their environment. That’s just the beginning. Other sessions talk about data protection as a whole and the concept of data availability in our modern datacenters. Being a Veeam user or customer isn’t required to walk away with new concepts, ideas and knowledge. Click here to view the agenda.

We’re past the point of just needing backups, we need our data readily available in many different and evolving scenarios. From backups, to disaster recovery, to sandboxes for testing, data availability gets reduced to just having a copy of your data. Veeam is pioneering the data availability movement and has the tools in place to bring data availability to the always-on enterprise. Above all else, Veeam is on your side.

VeeamON 2015

Thoughts in the Airport

Traveling is one of my least favorite things. I have never done well on flights, waiting to take off, sitting still for hours, and feeling trapped. That trapped feeling is worse when I’m stuck in the middle or window seat. If I’m not on aisle I don’t want to fly.

This time, however, it’s different. Sure, I’ve been to tech conferences before. I’ve been to a handful of VMworld’s, went to Cisco Live and a few smaller conferences as well. But Storage Field Day? This is my first time being selected as a delegate at a Tech Field Day event. As I sit in the airport I’m nervous for a completely different reason.

Tech Field Day events are filled with companies presenting their latest and greatest products and solutions. This is an event that skips the marketing and gets into the nitty gritty. The delegates (11 of us this time around) get to ask questions of the people who built these products and have a vast knowledge of their inner workings. Viewers watching the live stream can have their questions relayed to the presenters via Twitter and the #SFD8 hashtag so they gain a better understanding as well.

So why the nerves? Sitting alongside storage experts such as Howard Marks and Ray Lucchesi who run the GreyBeards on Storage podcast (which I subscribe to) and Scott D. Lowe who is an author, a blogger, a former CIO and someone is who well known and well respected in the industry. It just so happens that Howard and Scott have done a combined 36 Tech Field Day events. Alex Galbraith, Viper┬áV.K, Jon Klaus, Dan Frith, Mark May, Enrico Signoretti, and Jarett Kulm are the remaining delegates who are also well known and respected as well. For a first timer like me, it doesn’t get much more intimidating.

That’s just the delegates, I haven’t even mentioned the presenters. We’ll be on-site at the Coho Data, Pure Storage, and Cohesity. With a recent IPO I’ll be curious to see what Pure will be showcasing and with their first GA release I’m interested in hearing more about Cohesity and where their product is at.

Violin Memory, Intel, INFINIDAT, Nimble Storage, Nexgen, Qumulo and Primary Data will also be presenting. With so little coming from Violin lately I’m curious what they’ve been up to (besides declaring that disk is dead). I’m also interested in where Nimble is at. With most of their competitors offering all flash solutions, Nimble is one of the last few hybrid-only vendors. Have they throw a bunch of SSD’s on their arrays and called it “All Flash” (ala NetApp) or are they working on something new?

As I sit in the airport at PDX waiting for my flight to arrive from Denver my nerves are about adding value to this event. Asking the questions and offering the perspective of a customer who has been responsible for deploying and administering storage over the last 7 years. Holding my own along side these storage industry experts and not letting myself get intimidated. This is out of my comfort zone, but I’m up for the challenge.

Thoughts in the Airport