Deploy VSAN Witness Appliance

The VSAN Witness Host is a virtual appliance that is deployed into an existing vCenter server. When deploying a 2 node or stretched cluster, the witness appliance acts as a tie breaker to determine which node(s) are still available in the event the nodes lose communication with each other. The witness The witness is deployed just like any other virtual appliance, but will require access to the management network and the network you’ve designated as your VSAN network. This appliance must be run OUTSIDE your VSAN cluster. This means that you cannot add this host as a member of the existing VSAN cluster and you also should not run it as a virtual appliance inside your existing VSAN cluster.

1. Choose the cluster that will host the appliance. Click on “File” then “Deploy OVF Template”
step01

2. Browse to select the .OVA file and click “Next”
step02

3. Review the details of the appliance and click “Next”
step03

4. Review the license agreement and click “Accept” followed by “Next”
step04

5. Enter the name of the Witness Appliance and its location then click “Next”
step05

6. Choose the appropriate size of the appliance and click “Next”
step06
a. As this is a test, I’m choose the “Tiny” size. You can ignore the disk component requires for any size. As this is a virtual appliance, it will deploy the appropriately sized drives that will designated as SSD and spinning disl

7. Choose the provisioning type and click “Next”
step07
a. This is appliance is being deployed to a separate VSAN cluster than the one it will be acting as the witness for. This appliance can be deployed on shared storage, local storage, or another VSAN datastore.

8. Choose the appropriate networks for management and witness (VSAN). In this deployment, management lives on the “VM Network” and witness (VSAN) traffic is on the “VM-VSANnetwork”. This network is shared with the vMotion network and just needed an additional VM Portgroup created on each of the hosts in the cluster where this appliance is being deployed. Click “Next”
step08

9. Enter a root password for this appliance. Remember, this is a host that you will need to login to in order to administer so if there is a standard root password that you use it would be a good idea to use that here. Click “Next”
step09

10. Review the deployment settings and then click “Finish”
step10

11. Once deployed, you will need to configure the appliance like any other host. Power on the appliance and open the console, press F2 and login as root with the password you assigned in step 9
step11

12. Scroll to “Configure Management Network” and press “Enter”
step12

13. Ensure the Network Adapter assigned to your management network is “vmnic0”
step13
a. Set a VLAN (if necessary) for the management network, then assign your IPv4 and/or IPv6 settings for the management network to make it accessible on your network. Assigned DNS as needed as well. Press “ESC” and then press “Y” to configure settings and restart the management network
step13a

14. Once the host can communicate on the network, add it as a new host in vCenter.
a. Remember that this host should not be part of your VSAN cluster or any other cluster. It should be a standalone host in your datacenter.

15. Select the host in the vCenter client and configure networking for it. Locate the “witnessSwitch” and click “Properties”
step15

16. Select the “witnessPg” and click “Edit”
step16

17. On the “IP Settings” tab, enter the IP and subnet mask for the VSAN traffic network. Click “OK” at the bottom”
step17

18. Once you have confirmed that network settings are successful, login to the vSphere web client and navigate to the VSAN cluster to be configured

19. Click the “Manage” tab, then choose “Fault Domains & Stretched Cluster” under “Virtual SAN”
step19

20. In the “Streteched Cluster” box click “Configure”
step20

21. Name the fault domains and place the hosts into the appropriate fault domain. This is a 2 node cluster with 1 host in each fault domain. Click “Next”
step21

22. Locate the VSAN witness appliance host that was added to this vcenter and click “Next”
step22

23. Choose the flash drive for and the HDD for cache and capacity and click “Next”
step23

24. Review the settings and click “Finish”
step24

25. Once completed, you will now see the status of the stretched cluster as “Enabled”, the preferred fault domain and the designated witness host.
step25

Deploy VSAN Witness Appliance

VSAN – Host Not Contributing Stats

After an upgrade or maintenance on one or more of the nodes in a VSAN cluster one of the hosts can stop contributing performance stats. This is not a production down issue, but should be addressed to see the most up-to-date stats across all the nodes.

The fix for this is one of three things, but each of them involves turning off performance statistics on the cluster which will cause all historical performance stats to be removed. My hope is that VMware will fix this issue in an upcoming release because a loss of historical is not tolerable in all environments.

1. View the health of the VSAN by logging into the vCenter web client. Navigate to the appropriate vCenter and cluster, then click the “Monitor” tab, followed by “Virtual SAN” then click on “Health.” Expanded “Performance service” and click the warning for “All hosts contributing stats”
step01

2. At the bottom you will now see the list of hosts that are not contributing stats
step02

3. Now that we’ve identified the problem host, we need to disable VSAN performance service temporarily. Navigate to the “Manage” tab for this cluster then click on “Health and Performance” under “Virtual SAN”
step03

4. Click “Turn off” in the “Performance Service” box

a. Click “OK” to confirm stopping the service which will erase all existing performance data
step04a

5. Confirm Perform Service has been disabled by refreshing the page
step05

6. SSH to the affected host (using putty or similar SSH client) we identified in step 2 (you may have to enable SSH on the host before you can connect).
step06

7. Run the command below to restart the VSAN management agent. This should have no production impact so it is safe to perform outside of a maintenance window.
a. /etc/init.d/vsanmgmtd restart
step07a

8. Once the service has been restarted, go back to the vCenter web client and the click the “Edit” button for the Performance Service box
step08

9. Select the appropriate storage policy from the drop down list, ensure the “Turn ON Virtual SAN performance service” box is checked and click “OK”
step09

10. Confirm that the performance service is turned on and reporting healthy
step10

11. Navigate back to the “Monitor” tab and then “Virtual SAN” clicking the on the “Health” section. Click “Retest” to verify that all hosts are contributing stats.
step11

If this does not fix the issue, you can restart the process, but this time instead of restarting the vsanmgmt service on the one node, do it on all of the nodes in the cluster. Once the services have been restarted across all nodes then restart the performance service and all nodes should be contributing stats.

I have also seen a case where restarting the service on all nodes didn’t fix the problem. In that scenario I was able to fix the problem by entering maintenance mode on the problem node and choose “full data migration” so all the data would be removed from the cluster. After that was complete I completely rebuilt the host from scratch (including wiping the disks claimed by VSAN) then moving it back into the cluster. I haven’t heard from VMware of any other ways to fix this issue.

VSAN – Host Not Contributing Stats

The Beginning of Cloud Natives

Over the last 8 years I have built my career around VMware. I remember the first time I installed VMware Server at one of my jobs just to play around with and imported my first virtual machine. I had no idea what I was doing or how any of it worked, but I felt there was a future for me in this technology. As I moved on to other companies, the VMware implementations just got larger and larger; from 3 hosts all the way up to well over 1000.

Having spent time in these environments and with other users at local VMUG events and VMworld, I’ve seen that the skills required to be a VMware administrator are becoming commoditized. More people know about it than ever before, more blogs exist than ever before, and the necessity of meetings that revolve around VMware specifically seems to have run its course. While VMware remains integral to the datacenter today, there are skills we need to be developing and technologies we need to be exploring to ensure we’re not the ones being replaced when the next generation joins the workforce.

Enter Cloud Natives.
cloud natives

Cloud Natives was the idea of Dominic Rivera and myself as a means to bridge the gap between user and these new technologies. Cloud Natives looks to bring together the leaders in a technology space to present their solutions in one location. Rather than just letting vendors spew marketing material,  we take a different approach. Vendors are required to provide actual customers to present how their solutions have impacted their job and their business. No more outlandish claims, no more vanity numbers that don’t depict actual workloads, just real stories from real users.

We are kicking off 2016 with our first event on July 14th in Portland, OR. This event will be focused on one of the hottest technologies in the datacenter right now: Flash Storage. We’re bringing together the top players in the Flash Storage space and you’ll hear their customers discuss the benefits and challeneges they faced when moving away from legacy spinning disk arrays and even newer hybrid arrays.Our goal is to educate our members one event at a time.

Cloud Natives looks to bring together all the datacenter technologies into one place. Whether it’s a focus on hypervisors, traditional or next-generation storage and infrastructure, cloud providers, DevOps and automation, or anything else that is hot in the datacenter, we will be that go-to resource in the Pacific Northwest. Each event is an opportunity to evaluate multiple vendors from the perspective of the customer. With no overlapping session schedules, you can walk away better informed and get any questions answered in one event.

I encourage everyone in the Portland area to register for this event at the Cloud Natives site. Our goal is to bring a sense of community back to Portland. We want to be a place to meet and network, to encourage, to mentor and to grow in our careers. No matter the stage in our career, we all have knowledge and experience that can help someone else and it’s time we all do our part to give back to the community.

The Beginning of Cloud Natives