vSAN – Check VM Storage Policy & Compliance

As I continue to work with vSAN I discover there’s way more to do than just move some VMs over and you’re on your way. With multiple vSAN clusters each with different configurations I needed a way to monitor the current setup and check for changes. While creating a simple script to check which VM Storage Policy is assigned to each VM isn’t very difficult, a creating a script to check the storage policy of VMs across multiple vSAN datastores proved to be a little more difficult.

We run multiple PowerCLI scripts to check health and configuration drift (thanks to a special tool created by Nick Farmer) in our environment. In the event that a new vCenter is added or new vSAN datastore is deployed, we needed a simple script that can be run without any intervention or modification. Now we can be alerted when the proper VM storage policies isn’t assigned or the current policy is out of compliance.

To further complicate things in our setup, we create a new VM Storage Policy that contains the name of the cluster in which it’s assigned.  Due to the potential differences in each vSAN cluster (stripes, failures to tolerate, replication factor, RAID, etc) having a single Storage Policy does not work for us. In the event a VM is migrated from one vSAN cluster to another we need to check that the VM storage policy matches vSAN datastore cluster policy.

What this script does is grab all the clusters in a vCenter that have vSAN enabled. For each cluster that is found with vSAN enabled, it is filtering only the VMs that live on vSAN storage (with the name of “<cluster>-vsan”. Then we get the storage based policy management (Get-SpbmEntityConfiguration) of those VMs. The script then filters for a storage policy that doesn’t contain the cluster name OR a compliance status that is compliant.

$vsanClusters = Get-cluster | Where-Object {$_.vsanenabled -eq "True"}
foreach ($cluster in $vsanClusters)
{
$Cluster | get-vm |?{($_.extensiondata.config.datastoreurl|%{$_.name}) -like "*-vsan*"} |
Get-SpbmEntityConfiguration | Where-Object {$_.storagepolicy -notlike "*$Cluster*" -or $_.compliancestatus -notlike "*compliant*"} |
Select-Object Entity,storagepolicy,compliancestatus
}

Once this is run we can see the output below. I’ve obscured the names of the VMs, but we can see that there are still 12 VMs that are using the default vSAN Storage Policy instead of the cluster-specific storage policy they should be using. In addition, we see that the compliance status is currently out of date on most of these VMs. These VMs reside on 2 separate clusters and there are also 2 VMs that were filtered because they are on local storage in these clusters instead of vSAN.

storagepolicy01-12202016

 

vSAN – Check VM Storage Policy & Compliance

Cohesity – DataPlatform in the Cloud

cohesityWhat separates vendors is focus and execution. In a crowded market, finding the right backup provider is no easy task. While each product has its pros and cons, finding the differentiator can be a daunting task. While Cohesity is relatively new to this space (founded in 2013), they have that focus and execution necessary to be a leader in the backup space.

But Cohesity is more than just backups. The Cohesity storage appliance not only handles your backup storage needs, but can also run your dev and test workloads. Cohesity is focused on your secondary storage needs. That secondary storage consists of any workloads or data that isn’t production. By avoiding the draw of being another primary storage vendor, Cohesity is listening to customers, learning their needs and creating a solution that can fit any size business.

storageiceberg

The Cohesity solution was built for a virtualized (VMware-only) environment. Connecting directly to your vCenter servers and pulling your inventory allowing administrators to create backup jobs and policies. While their start was in virtualization, there are still many physical workloads in the datacenter. Creating agents for physical Windows, Linux, and SQL server all backing up to the same storage system and with the same policies prove no workloads can’t be protected by Cohesity.

But wait, there’s more!

While data protection is important, that’s only a small portion of the Cohesity offering. Running these backups directly from the Cohesity storage arrays allows you to free up primary storage resources and (potential) bottlenecks when running multiple instances of the same VM on a single array. Leveraging the SSDs that come in each Cohesity node as a cache tier, testing software patches and deployments from your backed up production VMs means that your performance doesn’t suffer. And with a built in QoS engine your dev/test workloads don’t have to affect the speed of your backups.

Cohesity provides a scale-out solution, meaning as storage demand increases so can your secondary storage space. Operating under a single namespace, as new nodes are added, your space increases without needing to reconfigure jobs to point to a new array or manually re-striping data. Cohesity has customers that have scaled up to as much as 60 nodes with over a petabyte of storage.

To the cloud!

Policy-based backups and replication ensures that your data will be available. Cohesity has the ability to distribute data across the nodes in a cluster, replicate to clusters in another locations, and also replicate your data to a cloud provider in order to satisfy offsite backup requirements. The latest addition to the Cohesity software portfolio is the DataPlatform Cloud Edition. This gives you the ability to run Cohesity in the cloud.

DataPlatform CE is more than just replicating data to the cloud. Your VMs can be backed up to your on-premises cluster and that data can be replicated to your cloud-based array. From that cloud-based array, you can then clone virtual machines to a native cloud format. This means your servers can be run in the cloud in their native format and available to test or even run in the event of migrations or datacenter outages.

Many backup and data protection software vendors are doing replication to the cloud such as Veeam and Zerto. While the features isn’t new, its addition makes Cohesity a serious contender in this space. DataPlatform CE is available currently in tech preview in the Microsoft Azure Marketplace, but Cohesity hopes to release it in the first half of 2017 with support for Azure as well as AWS.

Wrapping Up

Data protection and availability is never going to be exciting. Swapping tapes and deploying agents is tedious work. A fully integrated software solution that not only protects your data, but also helps solve the problem of data sprawl, a platform for developers to test against production data in an isolated environment and the ability to migrate workloads to the cloud. That’s about as exciting as it gets in data protection and that is just the tip of the (storage) iceberg.

________________________________________

Take a look at posts by my fellow delegates from Tech Field Day 12 and watch the videos here.

First Look at Cohesity Cloud Edition
The Silent Threat of Dark Data
Cohesity Provides All of Your Secondary Storage Needs
Secondary Storage is Cohesity’s Primary Goal

________________________________________

Disclaimer: During Tech Field Day 12, my expenses (flight, hotel, transportation) were paid for by Gestalt IT. Cohesity provided each delegate with a gift bag, but I am under no obligation to write about any of the presented content nor am I compensated for such writing.

Cohesity – DataPlatform in the Cloud

VSAN – Compliance Status is Out of Date

Occasionally the Compliance status of the performance service will go to the “out of date” status. This is not an alert that is thrown anywhere within vCenter. You will have to check this status by logging into the vSphere web client, locating your vCenter, choose the cluster, clicking on “Manage” then choosing “Health and Performance” under “Virtual SAN”
ComplianceStatus-a

As I have recently fixed this issue the above screenshot shows the “Compliant” status. Below are the steps to get to that point.

1. In the box for “Performance Service” click “Edit storage policy”
ComplianceStatus-01

2. If there is a storage policy available in the drop down, select it and click “OK”. This will apply that policy and perform the compliance check.
ComplianceStatus-02

For the lucky few where that works, that’s all you need to do. If the storage policy list is empty you’ll need to restart the vsanmgmtd service on each of the hosts.

3. Enable SSH on each of the hosts in the VSAN cluster and using an SSH client (like putty), SSH to a host and run the following command to restart the vsanmgmtd service (this is a non-impactful operation and should be able to be performed during production hours with no impact)
a. /etc/init.d/vsanmgmtd restart

4. Repeat that command on each of the hosts in the cluster until they have all restarted their services
ComplianceStatus-04

5. Wait 5 minutes and then check to see if you are able to select a storage policy for the performance service. If not, move on to step 6

6. Now we’ll need to restart the vSphere Profile-Driven Storage Service on the vCenter server. This is also non-impactful and should be able to be performed in the middle of the day. If you’re using vCenter on windows, connect to the Windows server and restart the “Vmware vSphere Profile-Driven Storage Service”. If using VCSA (like this example) you’ll need to SSH to the VCSA and run the command below
a. Service vmware-sps restart

7. After the vmware-sps service restarts, log out of the web client and wait for 5 minutes while the storage profile service  completes its restart.

8. Log back in to the web client, navigate to the vCenter server, click “Manage” then choose the “Storage Providers” tab
ComplianceStatus-08

9. Click the Synchronize Providers button to resync the state of the environment
ComplianceStatus-09

10. Wait another 5 minutes while these synchronize completes. After 5 minutes, navigate to the VSAN cluster in the web client. Click on “Manage” then choose “Settings” and locate “Health and Performance” under the “Virtual SAN” section
ComplianceStatus-10

11. In the Performance Service box, click the “Edit Storage Policy” button
ComplianceStatus-11

12. From the drop down list you should be able to select the appropriate VSAN storage policy and then click “OK”
ComplianceStatus-12

13. After this is selected the compliance status should change to “Compliant” and you should be all set.

So far these are the only steps that I have needed to follow in order to fix this issue. Let me know if there are any other fixes available.

 

 

 

VSAN – Compliance Status is Out of Date

Change IP of vCSA

While changing the IP address of my vCenter Server is not something I’ve ever had to do before that changed this week. In my quest to separate networks into more logical groupings instead of everything living on the same subnet I had to change the IP address of my vCenter Server Appliance to place it on a new network along with the hosts it was managing. There is apparently a right way and a wrong way to do this.

I logged into the vCSA web interface (vCenterIP:5480), clicked on the “Network” tab and then click on “Address” and assumed this would be the correct place. So I changed the IP address and clicked “Save Settings” then rebooted the appliance.

changeip012315-step1

Yeah…that wasn’t right. As I watched the appliance boot from the console I saw a lot of errors being thrown trying to access services running on the old address and failing. Then I decided to shut down (not reboot) the vCSA and try a different method. This is a pretty simple process, but in case you’re looking for the right way of doing it, this is what worked for me.

Once the appliance is powered off, right click and choose “Edit Settings”
changeip012315-step2

Click the “Options” tab then choose “Properties” under “vApp Options”
changeip012315-step3

Enter the new IP address, gateway, and any other information that is changing. If you’re moving it to a new portgroup, update that now as well and click “OK”
changeip012315-step4

Once the changes have been made, power on the appliance and you should see the new addresses being referenced during start up.
changeip012315-step5

And now that start up is complete, we see the new IPs listed for managing the appliance and you should be able to connect on the new IP.
changeip012315-step6

Like I said, this is a very simple process. Once the vCSA was running, my hosts were notified of the change and were still in their cluster. Nothing bad happened and the lab continued to function as expected.

Change IP of vCSA

Restore Files & AD Objects From NetApp & Veeam v8

With the release of Veeam Backup & Replication v8 we can restore directly from NetApp Snapshots. Whether it’s an entire VM, individual files, or just some objects in Active Directory, you can do it all from the Veeam console. For a guide on installing and configuring Veeam v8 with NetApp storage, click here

We’ll be testing the restore of individual files and some Active Directory objects for this blog post. In this scenario we have a couple Domain Controllers (2008 R2) and a couple of member servers with some files that we’ll delete. We also have an OU with a couple users, a member server, and a group.

Each of these VMs sit on either of these two volumes, Win_2008 and Win_2012. If you click on “Storage Infrastructure” in the Veeam Backup and Replication console, then expand your NetApp storage you’ll see a list of all the volumes available and their snapshots.
veeamrest120114-part1

1. I’ve taken a snapshot in NetApp System Manager of these volumes. To list these snaps, refresh the volume by right-clicking on the volume and choosing “Rescan volume” or right click on the storage array and choose “Rescan Storage” (Since we have 2 volumes to refresh, we’ll rescan storage.
veeamrest120114-step1
2. A new window will popup showing the progress
veeamrest120114-step2
3. Once completed, we now see the new snapshot I created called “Pre-delete”
veeamrest120114-step3
4.I’m going to delete a file from the server “Lab2008” (on the Win_2008 datastore) and “Lab2012” (on the Win_2012 datastore) that are sitting on my desktop.
veeamrest120114-step4a
veeamrest120114-step4b
5. And let’s also delete the OU “Delete Test” which contains a couple test users, a group they are apart of and the VM “Lab2008”
veeamrest120114-step5
6. Now that those files and OU\objects have been delete, let’s go back to the Veeam console and see what we can recover. We’ll start with the files for the “Lab2012” VM.
7. Expanding “Win_2012” datastore in “Storage Infrastructure” view, click on the name of the snapshot I created earlier and we see the “Lab2012” VM
veeamrest120114-step7
8. We right-click on “Lab2012”, hover over “Restore guest files” and then choose “Microsoft Windows”
veeamrest120114-step8
9. Under the “File Level Restore” screen, click “Customize” in the bottom right corner
veeamrest120114-step9
10. As long as you’re restoring to a vCenter/Host that’s already been added to Veeam, choose the host, resource pool (if any) and folder. Click “OK” then click “Next”
veeamrest120114-step10
11. Enter a reason for the restore and click “Next”
veeamrest120114-step11
12. Click “Finish”
veeamrest120114-step12
13. The restore session will open and mount the snapshot/VM to the chosen host
veeamrest120114-step13
14. In vCenter, we see these 2 tasks of creating a datastore and registering the virtual machine.
veeamrest120114-step14
15. On the host, we see a new powered off VM with the name of “Lab2012” followed by a GUID.
veeamrest120114-step15
16. Back at the Veeam console, the Backup Browser window appears and we can browse to the location of the deleted file
veeamrest120114-step16
17. From here, we can copy the file to our local machine or restore it directly to the Virtual Machine. Right click on the file and choose “Restore” then “Overwrite”
veeamrest120114-step17
18. We’ll pick “Use the following account” and choose my Lab Domain credentials and click “OK”
veeamrest120114-step18
19. The restore process will start and you’ll see this output if you click “Show Details”
veeamrest120114-step19
20. Logging back in to “Lab2012” we can see the file has been restored
veeamrest120114-step20
21. Close the “Restoring files” window in the Veeam console and the “Backup Browser” window. After they’re closed, the VM will be unregistered on the host and the datastore will be unmounted.
22. I’m doing a restore from “Lab2008” but this time I will just copy the file to my local computer instead of restoring to the guest VM. After browsing the datastore snapshots and choosing “Restore Guest Files”, we’ll browse the directory structure, locate the file, right-click and choose “Copy To”
veeamrest120114-step22
23. A window will pop up to choose the folder location on your machine and whether to preserve permissions and ownership. Then click “OK”
veeamrest120114-step23
24. Now in the root of the C: drive we have the “Lab2008-txt” file
veeamrest120114-step24
25. Let’s look at the “Lab2008” VM now. It was in that OU we deleted and after rebooting it and trying to login we receive the message “The security database on the server does not have a computer account for this workstation trust relationship”. We can fix that.
veeamrest120114-step25
26. Back in the Veeam console and the “Pre-delete” snapshot for the “Win_2008” datastore, we’ll locate the “Lab-DC01” VM. Right click on the VM, hover over “Restore application items” and then click “Microsoft Active Directory objects”
veeamrest120114-step26
27. Our host settings are saved from the last restore we did, so click “Next”
veeamrest120114-step27
28. Enter a restore reason and click “Next”
veeamrest120114-step28
29. Review the summary and click “Finish”
veeamrest120114-step29
30. The Veeam Explorer for Microsoft Active Directory window will appear
veeamrest120114-step30
31. Then the VM will be mounted in vCenter
veeamrest120114-step31
32. Once the Veeam Explorer window for AD opens, you’ll be able to browse your Domain object. We’ll expand the “LabOU” object where we see “Delete Test” with the same 2 test users, “Lab2008” server and the group those users belong to.
veeamrest120114-step32
33. Right click the “Delete Test” OU and choose “Restore container to LabDC.local”
veeamrest120114-step33
34. Enter the credentials for the account with access to add objects to the domain and click “OK”
veeamrest120114-step34
35. You’ll see the progress of the restore and then the summary of how many objects were restored
veeamrest120114-step35

(In order for this to work your Veeam server will need network access to the live domain controller)

36. If we refresh the screen for Active Directory Users and Computers on “Lab-DC01” we’ll see the OU is back with all of it’s objects
veeamrest120114-step36
37. In the properties for the users, we can see that group membership was retained. The group “Email Group” is located in another OU and that membership was restored as well
veeamrest120114-step37
38. And now when we try to login to “Lab2008” with domain credentials it works with no issues.

 

How fast can this restore happen? From the time I opened the Veeam console until the time the OU reported as being restored took 3 minutes and 34 seconds. In an emergency where someone accidentally deletes an entire OU, a user account, a server, or anything else, they can all be restored in under 5 minutes time without the need to reset any passwords and everything will work without anyone ever noticing. Veeam is awesome and just keeps getting better and better.

Restore Files & AD Objects From NetApp & Veeam v8

Veeam v8 Install With NetApp Config

Veeam has released v8 of it’s Backup and Replication software. As a long time Veeam user this is a release I have been waiting for. Previously, Veeam had released support for storage snapshots on HP storage arrays, but with my environments being primarily NetApp over the last few years I wasn’t able to take advantage. Now in v8, we can restore and backup directly from snapshot. This speeds up the process and limits the impact on the Virtual Machines in the environment.

This guide walks you through a brand new installation of Veeam Backup & Replication v8 on Server 2012 and how to add your NetApp storage array as an object to browse existing snapshots. This is a high-level guide and in the future I’ll do a more in-depth backup/restore from Storage. For my guide on installing Veeam v7 with Windows 2012 R2 Data Deduplication, click here.

If you’re not interested in a custom SQL Express installation as well, pick up the guide at step 15. Steps 1-15 show how to install SQL Express to the secondary drive to prevent growing databases from affecting the main OS partition.

Prerequisites:

1. Dedicated server for installing Veeam
2. License file for Veeam (copied out to the server)
3. Latest version of Veeam v8 downloaded and mounted on the server (the installer is in an .ISO)
4. A service account for running the Veeam services (Optional, but my preferred method)
5. Username/password with admin rights to vCenter
6. Username/password for NetApp array (for this post I’ll be using the ‘root’ account)

Steps:

1. Right click the DVD drive and click “Open”
veeamv8111714-step1
2. Navigate to Redistr -> x64. Locate SQLEXPRx64.exe, right click and choose “Run as administrator”
veeamv8111714-step2
3. Click “Yes” to run the installer if prompted
veeamv8111714-step3
4. Under the “Installation” section, click “New SQL Server stand-alone installation”
veeamv8111714-step4
5. Click the check box for “I accept the license terms” and decide if you want to send feature usage data to Microsoft then click “Next”
veeamv8111714-step5
6. Ensure the check box for “Include SQL Server product updates” is checked and click “Next”
veeamv8111714-step6
7. Updates and setup files will install…
veeamv8111714-step7
8. Choose the features to install (Database Engine Services is the only thing required). Choose the install directory (I always choose the secondary drive of the machine and click “Next”
veeamv8111714-step8
9. Choose a name for the instance or leave as default (SQLExpress), choose the instance root directory (secondary drive again) and click “Next”
veeamv8111714-step9
10. Enter a service account for running the SQL DB engine (or leave it as local system) and click “Next”
veeamv8111714-step10
11. Choose “Mixed mode” for the authentication type then enter a password for the “sa” account (Immediately save this password somewhere). Choose the groups/users that will be SQL Server administrators
veeamv8111714-step11a

a. Be default, only users/groups added here will have access to the Veeam console. If you don’t want to grant permissions to the SQL instance, you can grant access to these users/groups for the Veeam database after it has been created

12. Click on the “Data Directories” tab and ensure all the directories are pointing to the secondary drive and click “Next”
veeamv8111714-step12
13. Choose whether to send error reports and click “Next” and the installation will begin
veeamv8111714-step13
14. Once the installation completes, click “Close”
veeamv8111714-step14
15. Close the “SQL Server Installation Center” window. Navigate back to the root of the DVD drive. Right click on “Setup.exe” and choose “Run as administrator”
veeamv8111714-step15
16. Click “Yes” to run the installer if prompted
veeamv8111714-step16
17. Click “install” for “Veeam Backup & Replication”
veeamv8111714-step17
18. Click “Next”
veeamv8111714-step18
19. Read and accept the license terms and click “Next”
veeamv8111714-step19
20. Click “Browse” and locate your license file then click “Next”
veeamv8111714-step20
21. Choose the features to install and the install directory then click “Next”

a. To install to a different location (like a secondary drive), the folders need to be created ahead of time
veeamv8111714-step21

22. If any features are missing, click “Install”
veeamv8111714-step22
23. Once the system configuration check passes, click “Next”
veeamv8111714-step23
24. Review the default configuration and if no changes need to be made, click “Install”
veeamv8111714-step24
25. Once the install completes, click “Finish”
veeamv8111714-step25
26. Close the setup window and restart the server
27. After the server finishes rebooting, login and view the services to ensure the Veeam and SQL services that are “Automatic” have started
veeamv8111714-step27
28. Open “Veeam Backup & Replication”
veeamv8111714-step28
29. Click “Managed servers” on the left side and then click “VMware vSphere”
veeamv8111714-step29
30. Enter the name or IP of the vCenter Server and click “Next”
veeamv8111714-step30
31. Click the “Add” button and then enter the username/password of an account with permissions on the vCenter server. Click “OK” then click “Next”
veeamv8111714-step31
32. Click “Finish”
veeamv8111714-step32
33. To add your NetApp storage systems to Veeam, click on “Storage Infrastructure” and then click the “Add Storage” button
veeamv8111714-step33
34. Click “NetApp Data ONTAP”
veeamv8111714-step34
35. Enter the Name or IP of the storage system and click “Next”
veeamv8111714-step35
36. Click “Add” to add credentials to connect to the NetApp then choose the protocol and port. Click “Next”
veeamv8111714-step36
37. If the name/IP and credentials work, click finish and discovery of VMs and LUNs/Volumes will begin.
veeamv8111714-step37
38. Once storage and VMs have been discovered, click “Close”
veeamv8111714-step38
39. In the “Storage Infrastructure” view, expand “NetApp”, then the storage system. Choose a volume with virtual machines and current volume snapshots. Expand the volume, choose a snapshot and see what VMs are inside.
veeamv8111714-step39

a. From this view you can delete existing snapshots, create new storage snapshots, and rescan the volume for new snapshots. At the VM-level, you can instantly recover the VM from snapshot, restore guest-OS files, and even restore objects from Active Directory, Exchange, SQL or SharePoint.
veeamv8111714-step39a

40. Click on “Backup & Replication” then expand “Backups” and click on “Storage snapshots.” You’ll see a list of all the volumes that have snapshots, what VM’s are in those snapshots, and how many restore points are available.
veeamv8111714-step40

This is the basics of installing Veeam v8 and connecting to your vCenter Server and NetApp Storage. The process is incredibly simple and like every else from Veeam it just works. In the future I intend to add more restore scenarios such as application item recovery and VM recovery from storage snapshots.

Veeam v8 Install With NetApp Config

Tegile Array Replication and Restore

These days most of my replication is handled at the VM-level by software design for virtualization. While that is the case for most of my evironment, I still have a few non-virtualized workloads that run on shared storage that need to be replicated in the event of a disaster at my primary location. This process has never been too complex from my days of working with NetApp and now as I continue exploring the Tegile I’m happy to say that it’s just as easy through the GUI.

Documenting this process for my non-virtual workloads would be a little difficult so I’ve decided to document this process using an NFS datastore containing a few virtual machines. The first half of this guide is setting up the replication relationship and replicating the data. The second-half is the process to actually restore that data and make it usable at your DR site.

 

1. Login to the web interface of the Tegile that is the replication source
2. Click on “Settings” then “App-Aware”
tegiledr111214-step2
3. Click on “Zebi Replication” on the left column
tegiledr111214-step3
4. Under the tab “Replication Target” click the “Add” button (This is adding the DR Tegile as the target array)
tegiledr111214-step4
5. Enter the name or IP of the array (the shared Management IP address) and the username/password (Optionally you can specify a port range for replication which we won’t be doing for this documentation) and click “Add”
tegiledr111214-step5
6. Once it has been successfully added it will appear in the “Replication Target” list
tegiledr111214-step6
7. Login to the web interface of the DR target Tegile, click on “Settings” then “App-Aware”, choose “Zebi Replication” on the left column and then click on “Replication Source” tab. You should see your other array listed here (The IP address will be the “management” IPs of each controller, not the shared management IP for both arrays)
tegiledr111214-step7
8. Back on the Primary Tegile (Replication source) click on “Data”
tegiledr111214-step8
9. Click on the disk pool then then project that will be replicated
tegiledr111214-step9
10. For this documentation I’ve created a Project named “NFS_Replication” with a volume named DR_Windows with 4 VMs inside. Click on the project that will be replicated and click on the “Edit” button
tegiledr111214-step10
11. Click on “Replication” on the left column
tegiledr111214-step11
12. Click the “Add Replication” button
tegiledr111214-step12

a. Select the Target System and click “Next”
tegiledr111214-step12a
b. Select the “Target Pool” and enter a name for the “Replication Project”. Click “Next”
tegiledr111214-step12b
c. Choose what options are required and which volumes will be replicated (This test only has one volume, DR_Windows, but you can include or exclude any volumes that exist in this project. We’ll choose quiesce which will perform a VMware snapshot to put the OS in a consistent state. Click “Next”
tegiledr111214-step12c
d. Choose your schedule (manual or automatic), frequency, and how many additional snapshots (restore points) will be saved on the target array. For this example we’ll do daily replication that happens at 10:49 am and we’ll keep 14 snapshots. Click “Finish”
tegiledr111214-step12d
e. Once it’s all setup, you’ll see your target array, the target pool, and the target project
tegiledr111214-step12e

13. I have 4 VMs in that datastore (DR-Test01-04). Once the time hits, we can see that snapshots are taken, then removed, for each of the VMs in that datastore.
tegiledr111214-step13
14. On the DR target array, we can see we now have snapshots available for this project. (The reason there are 2 is because I initiated a manual replication sync for testing first)
tegiledr111214-step14

a. To manually kick off a replica snapshot, on the source array, find the project, click on “Replication” and then click the “Play” button that says “Replicate”
tegiledr111214-step14a

 

That is how simple it is to setup replication. Now let’s imagine we need to spin up those replicated VMs in this volume. Here is how we do that.

 

1. On the DR target array, click on Data, select the pool, then click on “Replica (1)” to view the replica project
tegilerest111214-step1
2. Click the “Edit” button for the NFS volume
tegilerest111214-step2
3. Click on “Snapshots” and find the snapshot you want to bring live (We’ll choose the latest version). Click the “Clone” button
tegilerest111214-step3

a. Cloning the snapshot will allow us to create a new project and NFS Volume from this snapshot and spin up these VMs in DR. By doing a clone, we’re able to continue to replicate data in the event you are testing replication instead of having an actual DR event.

4. Enter a name for the new Project (DR_NFS_Replication for this writing) and a name for the mount point (/export/DR_NFS_Replication for this writing) and click “Clone”
tegilerest111214-step4
5. If successful, you’ll receive this message about the new project being created. Click “OK”
tegilerest111214-step5
6. Close the window for “Share Configuration” and click on “Local (1)” under “Projects”
tegilerest111214-step6
7. Click on the “DR_NFS_Replication” project then view the Mountpoint of the Share (/export/DR_NFS_Replication/DR_Windows). Note the “c” before the share name which denotes it was a clone from another projects
tegilerest111214-step7
8. Click the “Edit” button for the project and then click on “Sharing”
tegilerest111214-step8
9. This is where you will add the IP addresses or range of IPs that need read/write and root access to the shares in this project. The IP addresses/ranges will carry over from the source array. Our IP range is the same in DR as our lab so we’ll leave this alone.
tegilerest111214-step9
10. Connect to your DR vCenter server or ESXi hosts. Click on the host, then “Configuration”, then “Storage”
tegilerest111214-step10
11. Click “Add Storage” towards the top right
tegilerest111214-step11
12. Choose “Network File System” and click “Next”
tegilerest111214-step12
13. Enter the NFS IP address of the DR Tegile, enter the folder path (/export/DR_NFS_Replication/DR_Windows) and then enter the name of the Datastore (DR_Windows). Click “Next”
tegilerest111214-step13
14. Review the summary info and click “Finish”
tegilerest111214-step14
15. Repeat for each host that needs access to this datastore. Afterwards, right click the datastore and click “Browse Datastore”
tegilerest111214-step15
16. Inside you’ll see the 4 VMs we that were located in here before. Open each folder, right click the VM name.vmx file and choose “Add to inventory”
tegilerest111214-step16
17. Enter the name and location for the VM and click “Next”
tegilerest111214-step17
18. Choose the Cluster or host and click “Next”
tegilerest111214-step18
19. Review the settings and click “Finish.” Repeat for each VM that needs to be added.
tegilerest111214-step19
20. Power on all the VMs and now you can run any validation tests or bring these VMs live in a DR event
tegilerest111214-step20

 

Obviously, the process of mounting the datastore in your DR vCenter Server and re-adding the VMs one by one would be time consuming and tedious. When developing your DR plans, having this process scripted (easy enough in something like PowerCLI) ahead of time on the vCenter side of things would ease that burden. From the standpoint of the Tegile, this process is fairly intuitive and simple to setup. One of the things I love is that by default the data you are bringing live on the DR site is a clone and replication continues running without being affected.

Tegile Array Replication and Restore